Finding The Best Rabbit Nesting Box

You may have noticed a few little behavioral quirks in your rabbit; maybe she’s more aggressive than usual, and maybe she’s taken a sudden interest in hoarding random bits of fluff and cardboard? If so, it looks like your beloved rabbit is expecting a new litter of cute, fluffy, rabbit kits! Take a look at the best rabbit nesting box options here.

Firstly, congratulations! And secondly, your rabbit deserves only the best rabbit nesting box! Even if you’re rabbit isn’t eating for two (or three or four) a nesting box can be a great way of keeping your bunny warm and cozy throughout the colder months.

Fortunately, there are heaps of options on the market, and you can also easily make your own. If you’re first-time rabbit breeders, it’s super important that you get to know the basic information of preparing your bunny for weaning her kits. Read on to get yourself clued up on the specifics of rabbit nest boxes:

What can I use for a rabbit nesting box?

Wood

Hands down, the best material to use for your rabbit nesting box is wood. It’s the most natural-feeling, so your rabbit won’t be too confused by the new addition to her home.

Remember though, wooden boxes can be a little tough to clean, and it’s super important that your rabbits’ nesting box is clean and hygienic throughout her pregnancy. But, a little effort goes a long way!

The Top 3 Wooden Rabbit nesting boxes

Trixie Pet Products Natura Small Animal Home

Overview

This nesting box is ideal for small animals such as rabbits or guinea pigs. The front door folds down to serve as a ramp, Whilst The raised floor prevents decay while promoting circulation.
The opening roof makes it easy to access your pet should you need to clean, or check on your pet. Added protection in the form of a locking front door prvides secuirty and pretiection from any unwanted guests.
A really cool feature that we like, is that the hutch can be extended with a run and cover, making it ideal for excercise and rest!

Pros

  • Well built, sturdy construction
  • Access through the roof opening is very useful
  • Extendable with a run and cover
  • Locking front door for added security

Cons

  • Reported issues with hinges. something that can be easily rectified

CO-Z Topnotch Wooden Hutch

Overview

Made from cdar wood, this nesting hutch is durable in even the most challenging weather conditions.
Assembly is straight forward, with all the bits and pieces to put the hutch together quickly as easily using the included instructions.
The roof on this hutch can be opened, which is a feature we always like to see on these hutches. This makes cleaning and interaction so much easier! We also like the slope at the door opening, which makes it easy for your pet to access.
Security is not an issue with strong sturdy bolt-ons and a clasp to fasten the front door.

Pros

  • Solid construction with durable materials
  • Access through the roof opening is very useful
  • Front opens into a slope to make it easy access
  • heavy duty bolt ons for added security

Cons

  • Check the size of this hutch prior to purchasing for a large pet

Petsfit Indoor Wooden Pet House with Wire Door

Overview

This Petsfit wooden pet house is probably more along the lines of a complete hutch for your rabbit…. but seeing as we love our pets so much why not!
This hutch is very sturdy and provides ample room for your nesting rabbit to exercise and rest. You may want to section an area off for nesting, but that could be easily achieved by adding wooden crate or a section of pet friendly wood.
More of an indoor hutch, so no real focus on security. Access is great with the removeable lid.

Pros

  • Solid construction with durable materials
  • Access through the roof opening is very useful
  • Huge size for your nesting rabbit

Cons

  • Not very seucure so be sure to use indoors
  • you will probably need to add a section for nesting

Plastic

Okay, not so natural looking. But choosing a plastic rabbit nest box will eliminate the cleaning difficulties posed by wooden nest boxes. Simply wipe them down when they get a little on the dirty side!

This nest box (okay, it’s actually for chickens, but it will work fine if your rabbits on the medium/smaller size) is a brilliant choice of plastic rabbit nest box. You can mount it on the side of your rabbit hutch, and it has a convenient entrance for your rabbit to venture in and out with ease.

Metal

Selecting a metal rabbit nest box is a brilliant choice, as they’re easy to clean and very durable. These metal nest boxes by KW Cages are crafted exactly for the purpose of rabbit nesting, and it comes in 5 sizes. So, no matter what size your furry friend is, they’ll have a nesting box that’s perfect.

So, while you can make your own nest boxes, most manufactured rabbit nest boxes will be crafted specifically with your pregnant rabbits’ needs in mind: they’ll be ventilated, have an entrance, and be properly sized.

More information: How to clean your rabbit nesting box

To clean your plastic or metal rabbit nesting box, simply scrub it with warm soapy water, and soak in a mild bleach solution for around 10 to 15 minutes (and obviously take your rabbit out, first!).

If you have a wood box, use a mild antibacterial spray and soapy water to scrub off any stubborn debris.

When should you put a nest box in rabbit cage?

Timing is paramount when it comes to putting your new nest box in your rabbit’s cage. Put it in too early, and your rabbits’ pregnancy hormones may not have kicked in, so she’ll likely end up chomping on the hay, and even possibly using it as a bathroom! Whoops.

If you know the exact date of conception (when your mamma rabbit “got busy” with her beau), aim to place the nest box inside her hutch around 28 days afterward. This doesn’t have to be exact, but you can make a rough estimate.

How big should a nesting box be for a rabbit?

Aside from making sure your new rabbit nest box fits through your hutch door (duh!) you’ll want it to be considerably larger than the dimensions of your mamma rabbit. Measure her from head to toe, and her width, then add 6″-7″ inches to that measurement. Viola, you’ve found your perfect nest box size!

The general rule is go for around 18″ long, 10″ wide, and 10″ tall. Your rabbit is pregnant, and she needs to be able to be comfortable and move freely. Remember, soon there’ll be little kits in the nest too, so they need plenty of space.

It’s good to know that the kits will spend a lot of their first few weeks nestled in their nest. After around 3 weeks, they’ll start to venture into the ‘outside world’ (read: their hutch), but will mostly return to the nest, where they feel safe, to sleep and rest.

Information on what you should put in a nesting box

In the bottom of your nest box, place around 1″ of pine shavings. In colder weather, add a little more. Then, fill the nest with straw. Like, completely. It’s helpful for your rabbit if you hollow out a little area for her initially, but usually, she’ll arrange things in the nest exactly the way she wants them.

Do rabbits need nesting boxes?

In short, yes. Rabbits, although domesticated, are instinctually prey animals. This means they won’t give birth unless they feel 100% at home and safe from any predators. So, you can see why a nest is super important.

Providing a nest box simulates the kind of environment they themselves would prepare in the wild. A safe, dark place, with no human contact (make sure you minimize contact with the baby rabbits, as mother rabbits are known to abandon their babies if they smell too much like humans!).

So, with our helpful guide, you should be good and ready to properly care for your pregnant rabbit. Of course, with great cuteness, comes great responsibility, and your rabbit looks to you to give her the optimal environment for birthing her little ones. So, make sure her kits have the absolute best start in life with a fabulous rabbit nesting box!

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